Royals to debut powder blue jerseys

Royals to debut powder blue jerseys

KANSAS CITY -- Fans who have been clamoring for the return of the Royals' powder blue uniforms will see their wishes come true on Saturday night.

The club's new home alternate jersey, powder blue with dark blue and white accents, will make its debut in a game against the Minnesota Twins at 6:10 CT at Kauffman Stadium.

For years, fans have been asking for the powder blues, and in January, Royals management unveiled them at a get-together for season-ticket holders. Outfielder Jose Guillen made his first Kansas City appearance wearing one of the new uniform tops.

"I'm looking forward to wearing them," left fielder Mark Teahen said. "I'm overall excited because I know what history they represent, so I'm glad to be part of that."

For the first game with the uniforms, the Royals will give away replicas of the Billy Butler No. 16 powder blue jersey to the first 20,000 fans at Kauffman Stadium.

The powder blues were first worn by the Royals in 1973 as their road uniforms. The color became synonymous with the great clubs of the 1970s and '80s. They were retired in 1992 in favor of traditional gray.

The new powder blues will be an alternate home jersey, worn with white pants. The plan is to wear them for Sunday games, even though their debut is set for Saturday night.

"It's nice that we're bringing back tradition and what we're trying to do with the history and with the new and trying to mix it together," pitcher Jimmy Gobble said. "It's going to be a good look and the fans will like it, and that's what it's all about."

However, Gobble added a note of caution.

"I don't think baby blue, dark blue, black, red, purple is going to matter," he said. "Maybe it's a winning tradition, but it's not going to help us win. It's something nice for the fans, something to wear on Sundays and a different look."

Teahen saw a marvelous side effect for the new powder blues.

"I have baby blue eyes, oddly enough, so that brings them out," he said.

P.S. Teahen is a notorious kidder.

Dick Kaegel is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.