Royals noting current injuries for future reference

Royals noting current injuries for future reference

KANSAS CITY -- When players like Lorenzo Cain, Jarrod Dyson and Chris Getz have multiple injuries in a season, it's unfortunate but it also figures into a team's planning for next season and beyond.

"Absolutely, it does," Royals manager Ned Yost said. "You better have guys on your roster that are durable and guys that can make it through a 162-game season. Guys that are injury-prone or that have a history of being injured, you've got to know and you have to make decisions based around it in terms of your depth."

Cain and Dyson have shown that they are swift, exciting outfielders and Getz that he's a sure-handed, reliable second baseman. All three hit around .270 this season and swiped a lot of bases. So the talent is there.

"The talent doesn't do you any good unless you're on the field," Yost said. "That's a big thing you have to consider."

Teams want players with durability.

"I don't know how to explain it because everybody's different, but you've got guys that have certain body types that enable them to go 162 games," Yost said. "Knock on wood, but guys like [Alcides] Escobar, [Mike] Moustakas, [Eric] Hosmer, [Jeff] Francoeur have never really had anything that really slows them down. But you get other guys that are really good players like Chris Getz and Cain and Dyson, it seems that one or two things crop up every year. There's nothing you can really do to prevent it. It's just their body types, I think."

Or maybe bad luck, like Getz's broken thumb while trying to bunt.

"When you get to a point where you're competing, you want your best players on the field, you want them to be able to play through stuff," Yost said. "I mean, [the Yankees'] Derek Jeter is a perfect example. The other day he pulls up lame at first base, he's right back in the lineup the next day. You have to learn your threshold to be able to play with certain injuries."

Yost pointed out that Moustakas played through a leg injury this season.

"He didn't miss a game," Yost said. "He knew how to gauge everything, when to turn it up, when to turn it down and get through it. That's an important attribute to have."