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KC's challenge overturns Blue Jays' hit, RBI

Foul call on Navarro's blast in ninth stands after crew chief review

KC's challenge overturns Blue Jays' hit, RBI play video for KC's challenge overturns Blue Jays' hit, RBI

KANSAS CITY -- After 10 straight games of no challenges, manager Ned Yost got back into the act on Tuesday night and saved a run in the Royals' 10-7 victory over the Blue Jays.

"At the point of the game [the second inning], the difference is being down 1-0 or 2-0, and I like having the recourse to go out there and get a call changed," Yost said.

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The Blue Jays had runners at first and third with two out when ex-Royal Chris Getz, in his first at-bat since being called up from Triple-A Buffalo, hit a bouncer. Second baseman Omar Infante grabbed it, made a quick throw to first baseman Eric Hosmer and Getz was called safe by umpire Mark Wegner.

Yost disagreed and issued a challenge with encouragement from Hosmer.

"It's a bang-bang play but, obviously, it's a little easier for me because I can feel rather than the umpire seeing it," Hosmer said. "It was a big situation because it brought them a run in, so I wanted to signal the dugout as soon as possible to get out there because I could feel it."

The instant replay crew in New York overturned the call and Getz was out. Dioner Navarro had crossed the plate on the play, but that run didn't count so the score remained 1-0 Toronto.

That wasn't the game's only instant replay incident. There was a crew chief review in the Blue Jays' ninth inning.

Edwin Encarnacion had just hit a two-run homer to tighten the score to 10-7 when Navarro also teed off against reliever Louis Coleman and the ball curved past the foul pole. But on which side?

"Me and the first-base coach were talking about it and we couldn't tell if it went behind it or in front of it," Hosmer said.

Crew chief Bob Davidson decided to find out for sure and checked with New York. Meantime, Yost was checking with his replay coordinator, Bill Duplissea.

"It was hard for us to tell in the dugout if it was fair or foul. We didn't know," Yost said. "Billy had it foul all the way -- not by much. It couldn't have missed the pole by inches, but he was on it."

Dick Kaegel is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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